Gift Ideas for Your Loved One with MD

Gift Ideas for Your Loved One with MD

Finding the perfect Christmas gift requires listening intently to the recipient’s wants and needs. This year, the social media team at Muscular Dystrophy News Today asked followers what would be on their wish lists to make their lives easier and more comfortable.

These recommendations are sure to put a smile on the face of the chronically ill or disabled warrior in your life.

The gift of mobility

Mobility aids and medical equipment are vital to maintaining quality of life and independence when living with a disease such as muscular dystrophy (MD). But the equipment often carries a steep price tag.

This Christmas, show someone how much you care by helping them pay for a mobility aid or medical device. It doesn’t have to be much. Any donation to provide those of us with chronic conditions a more fulfilling lifestyle is greatly appreciated.

If you have the means to provide a mobility aid, a hands-free walker or a walking stick and seat are helpful for many with MD.

Adaptive apparel

Buying clothing for someone with a disability can be trickier than you might think. Some people have difficulties with buttons because of a lack of mobility in their hands. For others, the fit of the garment is the biggest concern because they sit in a wheelchair or wear leg braces.

Tommy Adaptive is a line of adaptive clothing from Tommy Hilfiger. Among the offerings is a men’s cardigan that uses magnetic closures concealed as regular buttons.

For those who have trouble with shoes, Billy Footwear uses a zipper that goes along the outside and around the toe to eliminate the need for tying laces. The wide opening also makes the shoes easier to wear with braces.

Technology

Smartphones and tablets help folks like myself connect to the outside world. With the touch of a button or a voice command, we’re able to maintain relationships, work from home, and shop online without the added worries of discrimination, contagion, and inaccessibility.

The gift of technology is always appreciated. Here are some ideas to get you started:

  • Dragon Anywhere: This professional-grade mobile dictation app allows users to dictate documents of any length.
  • Electric height-adjustable computer desk: This desk easily transitions from sitting to standing at the touch of a button.
  • Smart LED light bulb: A light bulb that is compatible with Alexa, Siri, and Google Home means no more struggling to turn on a lamp.

A helping hand

It can be difficult to know how best to help someone with a chronic illness or disability. But it’s often the simplest acts of kindness that mean the most.

Cleaning the house is a low priority when trying to manage daily symptoms of MD. A subscription for a cleaning service would be a welcome solution.

A gift doesn’t have to cost more than a block of time. Many families with a disabled child or parent would welcome help with holiday cooking, or with putting up and taking down decorations.

Warm and cozy

Heat relieves pain, increases blood flow, and eases tense muscles. I recommend these products to ensure your loved one has the coziest winter yet:

  • Heated mattress pad: A pad with dual controllers allows each partner to decide their comfort level.
  • Wheelchair blanket: A fleece blanket with straps that attach to a chair is a good solution for keeping warm on the go.
  • Fitted heating pad: A heating pad that drapes around the shoulders offers welcome relief from pain.

I hope these ideas inspire you as you tackle your gift list. May your holiday be merry and bright.

***

Note: Muscular Dystrophy News is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or another qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Muscular Dystrophy News or its parent company, BioNews Services, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to muscular dystrophy.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *